EU Distressed Over Afghan Situation, Urges NUG Leaders to Unite

  • Date of Publication : 17/11/2016 at 09:53 GMT
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The European Union’s Special Representative for Afghanistan Franz-Michael Skjold Mellbin on Wednesday raised deep concerns over the ongoing turmoil in Afghanistan, urging the Afghan political leaders to settle their disputes and unite for the sake of the nation.

He also reiterated EU’s longstanding cooperation to Afghanistan in the years ahead.

“I think it is very important that there is a strong united leadership, all Afghans have to work together in this time of crisis, there is a very difficult political, economic and security situation, some of that is outside the control of Afghanistan, the Afghan people, some of these are out of the control of politicians, but certainly national unity, political unity something in the hands of the Afghans themselves and political leadership and that should be the baseline, I really think that there is a strong need for to take their responsibility,” said Mellbin.

Joining the EU diplomat, some Afghan lawmakers have also said that rifts within the political leadership was not in the interests of the country.

“Continuation of these disagreements does not support the interests of the nation, therefore the political leadership should sideline their disputes for the sake of the nation,” said MP Fatima Aziz.

Referring to the endemic corruption in Afghanistan, Mellbin hailed the establishment of the Anti-Corruption Justice Center (ACJC) and said it was a positive move to curb the scourge.

He asked government to process large corruption cases in the country as it will heal mistrust between the people and government.

“Tackling impunity is the cornor stone of getting rid of corruption in this country and therefore it is very good that the ACJC started its work, I think people should be a little patient, it takes time for any institution to build itself up to start a proper case load, I am sure that overtime it will have the ability to tackle also even larger cases than the ones they started with, what is very important now is that the institution gets off to a good start, that it systematically continues to work with this so the signal is sent to all who are involved with handling official money – that impunity is going to end,” he added.

The ACJC was established six months ago and aims to probe major corruption cases against government officials and non-government elements allegedly involved in graft.

“There is … hundreds of corruption cases that need to be investigated; the anti-corruption justice center has to probe all these cases in order to achieve public trust,” said Khan Zaman Amarkhail, head of Afghanistan Anti-Corruption Network (AACN).

The ACJC so far has arrested at least 31 people on charges of corruption and processed 53 corruption cases.

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